USA

USA

India

INDIA

BANGLADESH

BANGLADESH

Nepal

NEPAL

FIJI

FIJI

Pakistan

PAKISTAN

Sada-E-Watan

Pervez Saleem (Producer/Director)

6 Head Pains You Should Never Ignore

Remember in the good old days, when doctors made house calls? Yeah, I don’t either. But it sounds awesome: No waiting rooms. No cranky receptionists. No parade of nurses, residents, and other strangers poking you. Just you and your doctor, in the privacy of your own home.

We have the next best thing here at Men’s Health: dozens of the nation’s top doctors on speed dial. Cardiologists, neurologists, dermatologists, dentists . . . you name it. They don’t make house calls, but they will talk to us from the privacy of our own phone.

One of our most prolific top docs is T.E. Holt, M.D., a physician at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. We editors write from the patient’s perpective, but Dr. Holt writes from the doctor’s perspective. And he’s always insightful, whether he’s revealing keywords you can say to get a doctor’s attention or explaining how to spot a physician who doesn’t know what he’s doing.

1. Tension headache: This is your garden-variety headache, with diffuse pain wrapping across the top of your head. These headaches often result from stress or lack of sleep. They’re not usually disabling, typically fade overnight, and can be easily relieved with ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or aspirin.

2. Migraine headache: Migraines tend to hit one side of the head, and can last from several hours to several days. They’re usually marked by a sensitivity to sound and light. When a migraine strikes, you can manage it with Advil Migraine or Motrin Migraine Pain (both ibuprofen medications) or Excedrin Migraine (a combination of aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine).

3. Cluster headache: This one is an excruciating attack that explodes behind one eye, reaches a crescendo after about an hour, and then vanishes—only to return in a day or so. This goes on for a few weeks, and then stops for months. Numerous drugs target clusters, including some of the migraine meds.

The good news about these headaches, says Dr. Holt, is that they’re all completely harmless. But not every aching head is a simple headache. Here are six that could be a sign of something serious—and potentially deadly. Watch out for . . .

The Thunderclap Headache
If head pain hits you like a bolt out of nowhere, intensifying in a few minutes into the worst headache you’ve ever had, call 911. The list of causes for this kind of headache isn’t long (aneurysm, stroke, meningitis) but almost everything on it can be very quickly fatal, says Dr. Holt.

The Exercise Headache
If your headache comes on quickly and furiously with violent physical exertion, see a doctor right away. Chances are, the cause is benign, says Dr. Holt. But it also could be a subarachnoid hemorrhage.

The Headache that Spreads to Your Neck
Benign headaches stay in your head, says Dr. Holt. Headaches that don’t can be meningitis or a hemorrhage. So yes, call 911, especially if you have a fever, are just getting over a bacterial infection, have a rash, or can’t think clearly.

The Headache that Won’t End
A headache that comes and goes for days—with a low-grade fever, visual disturbances, and aching in one or both of your temples—often signals an inflammation of the arteries that can leave you blind if not treated. See your doctor right away, says Dr. Holt.

The Contagious Headache
Your family is all home on a cold, rainy Saturday. As the day goes on you develop a headache that grows steadily worse. If anyone else has the same headache, move everyone outdoors immediately. There’s a malfunction in your heating system and it’s spewing carbon monoxide. Once you’re out of the house, call the fire department. Your headache should clear up in a few hours.

The Headache that Wakes You Up
You should also be concerned if your headache has been worsening for weeks, says Dr. Holt, or if it’s present every morning when you wake up. This is the classic pattern for a slowly expanding mass. It may not warrant a 911 call, but you should see your doctor and schedule an MRI right away.

 

Remember in the good old days, when doctors made house calls? Yeah, I don’t either. But it sounds awesome: No waiting rooms. No cranky receptionists. No parade of nurses, residents, and other strangers poking you. Just you and your doctor, in the privacy of your own home. We have the next best thing here at Men’s Health: dozens of the nation’s top doctors on speed dial. Cardiologists, neurologists, dermatologists, dentists . . . you name it. They don’t make house calls, but they will talk to us from the privacy of our own phone. One of our most prolific top docs is T.E. Holt, M.D., a physician at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. We editors write from the patient’s perpective, but
Punjab police arrest six men, including ‘mastermind’ over alleged murders of Spanish sisters

Courtesy: Dawn News

The Gujrat police on Sunday said that it has arrested six men allegedly involved in the murders of two Spanish sisters who were shot dead in a village in Gujrat district for reportedly failing to take their husbands to Spain.

“The police have arrested the six people, including the mastermind, in the tragic incident,” the Punjab police tweeted.

Punjab Police Official@OfficialDPRPP
????? ????? ?????????? ????? ??? ???? ????? ????? ???? 6 ?????? ?? ?????? ?????.??????? ????? ?? ????? ????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ??????? ?????? ?? ???? ???? ?? ?? ????? ??? ?? ????? ?????? ??????? ??? ????IG ????? ?????? ???? ???? DPO????? ?? ?????? ??

Punjab Police Official@OfficialDPRPP
??? ?? ????? ?? ????? ????? ?? ?? ???????? ????? ??? ???? ?????? ?? ??? ?? ??? ?????? ???? ?? ??? ??? ??? ?? ?? ?? ????? ?? ??? ?? ??? ?????? ????? ???? ?????? ?? ??? ???????? ?? ??? ??? ??????

“According to preliminary investigation, the sisters were against their forced marriages and were allegedly killed by their brother and uncle,” it said, adding that the district police officer of Gujrat had been assigned the task of arresting the perpetrators after the inspector-general of Punjab took notice of the incident.

On Friday, Arooj Abbas and Aneesa Abbas, aged between 21 and 23 were found killed in their house. They were severely tortured before being shot dead.

The girls were married to their cousins in Pakistan more than a year ago but they were unable to get their respective husbands visas to settle with them in Spain.

Their in-laws suspected that they had intentionally delayed the procedure for their husbands’ visas, the police said. According to the police, the sisters’ bodies were shifted to the hospital for autopsy, whereas a team of forensic experts collected forensic evidence from the crime scene.

On Saturday, the police registered a case against seven nominated suspects, namely Raja Haneef alias Goga, the paternal uncle of the women, who was also the father-in-law of Aneesa, her mother-in-law Farzana Haneef, her husband Atiq, Arooj’s husband Hassan, her father-in-law Aurangzaib, the brother of the deceased Shehryar, Qasid Haneef and two unidentified suspects, under various sections.

The fire information report (FIR) was lodged on the report of ASI Nadeem of Gulliana police after the mother of the deceased sisters declined to become the complainant in murder case of her daughters.

Police sources told Dawn that District Police Officer Ataur Rehman had directed the police to become a complainant instead of lodging the case on report of a family member of the girls to avoid pardon or reconciliation.

Meanwhile, an official of Gujrat police, privy to the investigation, said that the initial investigation had revealed that the deceased women were demanding divorce from their cousins as they reportedly wanted to marry with two Pakistanis belonging to Mandi Bahauddin district who were settled in Spain. However, the family did not allow them to do so and brought them to Pakistan where their nikah was registered about a year ago.

A spokesman for Gujrat Police said the autopsy and forensic reports would ascertain whether the women were killed through asphyxiation or by the bullets as torture makes were found around their necks.
He added that at least four raiding teams had been constituted that were conducting raids on various locations to arrest the suspects.

On the other hand, the mother of deceased women, who is also in Pakistan, has been quoted as telling the investigators that she tried her best to save her daughters and begged for their lives when they were being tortured by the suspects.

The DPO of Gujrat is expected to address a news conference in this regard today.

Courtesy: Dawn News The Gujrat police on Sunday said that it has arrested six men allegedly involved in the murders of two Spanish sisters who were shot dead in a village in Gujrat district for reportedly failing to take their husbands to Spain. “The police have arrested the six people, including the mastermind, in the tragic incident,” the Punjab police tweeted. Punjab Police Official@OfficialDPRPP ????? ????? ?????????? ????? ??? ???? ????? ????? ???? 6 ?????? ?? ?????? ?????.??????? ????? ?? ????? ????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ??????? ?????? ?? ???? ???? ?? ?? ????? ??? ?? ????? ?????? ??????? ??? ????IG ????? ?????? ???? ???? DPO????? ?? ?????? ?? Punjab Police Official@OfficialDPRPP ??? ?? ????? ?? ????? ????? ?? ?? ???????? ????? ??? ????
Murder and suicide – By Rafia Zakaria

Courtesy: Dawn News
By Rafia Zakaria

SHE was from a small city in a southern state. Sania Khan, a Pakistani-American woman killed in a murder-suicide by her ex-husband Raheel Ahmad, had just moved to Chicago last year. Khan’s divorce from Ahmad was finalised in May of this year. On her TikTok profile Khan, herself a professional photographer, was documenting her journey healing from the painful divorce.

Apparently, her public statements about her relationship and the South Asian community’s response to it bothered Ahmad so much that he drove from Georgia where he lived all the way to Chicago. Then he went to Khan’s condominium and killed her. Ahmad appeared to have stayed in the condominium until he heard the police arrive. Officers at the scene reported hearing a gunshot and the sound of a man groaning. Inside, they found Khan’s body lying in the entrance; there was a gunshot wound to the back of her head. Ahmad was in another room with a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Next to him was a suicide note.

There is no doubt that Sania Khan was living a complicated life. According to her TikTok posts, her mother had stayed in an abusive marriage because she feared backlash from the South Asian community in Tennessee. In other posts, Khan described the threats made to her by community members who opposed her divorce. In some videos, she spoke about the constant moral judgements by community members about anyone not following the rules of an obedient wife. Khan had decided to abandon all these strictures so she could wear what she wished and create a new identity for herself. Even though she had obtained a restraining order against her ex-husband, he was able to get to her and murder her.

Khan’s murder tells a sordid story of South Asian diaspora communities in the West. Chattanooga, where Khan grew up, is a small city: its chief tourist attraction is a park called Rock City that is full of strange rock formations. Pakistani diaspora communities in small places tend to be the most rigid. Since the number of families is not very large, everyone is stuck with everyone else. Even worse, like other diaspora communities, the morals and ethos tend to follow norms that are at least 20 years old when most families migrated to America.

On her TikTok profile, Sania Khan had posted just the sort of videos that upset the self-styled guardians of morality in diaspora Pakistani communities.

Unlike actual Pakistani culture which has progressed in the past two decades, diaspora families are used to raising children according to dated norms and exerting judgement on any families that divert from them even a bit. Divorce is taboo so women have to choose between whether they want to end a bad marriage and face extreme ostracism and exclusion from the community or stay in the marriage and bear the abuse with community membership and support.

Khan had chosen divorce and rebellion. On her TikTok profile, she posted just the sort of risqué videos and photos that upset the self-styled guardians of morality in the diaspora Pakistani communities. She spoke openly about the depression that accompanies divorce and how hard it actually is to heal from it. It seemed that she had finally broken away from a relationship and a community that did not allow her to live the life she wanted. Working as a professional photographer doing shoots of weddings, graduations, marriage proposals and other happy occasions, she was supporting herself and realising her dreams as a newly single woman. All of it, visible on TikTok, seemingly enraged her ex-husband so much that he decided to kill her.

In the aftermath of Khan’s murder there has been a focus on the Pakistani community’s unwillingness to confront issues of abuse within their circles. Time magazine even chose to include “South-Asian communities engage in self-reflection” as part of the title of an article about the incident. The premise of it was that Pakistani communities promote a retrogressive version of marriage which demands that wives be subservient to their husbands and constantly at their beck and call. The insinuation is that Khan would still be alive today if the community was more supportive of women and less so of men like Ahmad who abuse and exploit women.

South Asian communities’ intransigence on the issue of divorce (which they bizarrely understand as a very American concept rather than a universal one) is undoubted. At the same time, it is true that Khan’s murder is also distinctly American. In the US, the likelihood of a woman being murdered is the highest after she leaves a relationship. Intimate partner violence of the sort that killed Khan is the number one cause of death in women under 35. Add to this the fact that one out of five American women report being victims of domestic violence.
If these numbers aren’t damning enough, there is the corollary issue of gun violence. The ease of procuring guns makes it very simple for would-be wife murderers to obtain lethal weapons for their nefarious plans. Perhaps if it were not so easy to obtain a weapon as it currently is in the US, Khan may have been alive today.

Femicide sadly is a universal phenomenon. Such is the hold of patriarchal norms that no one seems to know how to protect young women that leave abusive relationships. In the week since Khan’s murder there has already been at least one more murder-suicide in the US. This past weekend a soldier chased his wife into a mall where he killed her and then himself. It is entirely possible that by the time this article is published there will be even more. From all these examples and from Khan’s tragic death, it appears the world needs to focus on how to save women from bloodthirsty male egos which will stop at nothing to eliminate women who have dared to leave them.

The writer is an attorney teaching constitutional law and political philosophy.

Courtesy: Dawn News By Rafia Zakaria SHE was from a small city in a southern state. Sania Khan, a Pakistani-American woman killed in a murder-suicide by her ex-husband Raheel Ahmad, had just moved to Chicago last year. Khan’s divorce from Ahmad was finalised in May of this year. On her TikTok profile Khan, herself a professional photographer, was documenting her journey healing from the painful divorce. Apparently, her public statements about her relationship and the South Asian community’s response to it bothered Ahmad so much that he drove from Georgia where he lived all the way to Chicago. Then he went to Khan’s condominium and killed her. Ahmad appeared to have stayed in the condominium until he heard the police arrive. Officers at the
MOUNTAINEERING: HIGH FIVES AND HATS OFF

Courtesy: Dawn News
Video: YouTube
Mountain Tracks

Sportswomen of Pakistan rejoice over the recent achievement of mountain climbers Samina Baig and Naila Kiani, who became the first women of their country to summit K2

Samina Baig and Naila Kiani broke the cloud cover and the rocky ceiling to scale new heights and summit the world’s second highest peak, K2.

Maybe they can’t hear the cheering and applause right now because they are so high up in the mountains, but Samina Baig and Naila Kiani’s great feat of becoming the first two Pakistani women to summit K2 last week is also being celebrated by other Pakistani sportswomen. Here they are, sending their congratulatory messages to the two.

Noorena Shams
(squash player):

“It was incredible to see Samina and Naila summiting K2,” says squash player Noorena Shams. “A perfect act of resilience, strength, determination and ambition. They are simply paving the way for other girls across the nation to follow.”

The young squash player who hails from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa also shares that, in her village, most of the women climb hills to get wood, etc. “My mother, my khala [maternal aunt] also used to climb hills in their childhood. It used to be an adventure to climb the hills every time we used to visit our native village.

“But of course I have always dreamed of free mobility for women. They do not have to climb hills only to get timber. That is a struggle in my area. We can’t have hikes without purpose,” she concludes.

Tushna Patel
(off-road race driver):

Pakistan’s first female rally driver Tushna Patel says she is proud to have talent such as Baig’s and Kiani’s in Pakistan. “And the government should support this talent so that more and more sports people can bring pride to us on an international level,” she says.

“Samina and Naila have played a great role in promoting mountain climbing along with the image of Pakistan globally. Talent like theirs needs to be tapped into at a younger age, where it can be trained to achieve great honours worldwide,” she adds.

“I myself being the first Pakistani off-road female racer feel that there is a lack of government support and there is more hidden talent to be discovered in this country. I was lucky to have a supportive husband to help me achieve what I have in a truly male-dominated sport, but I am also proud that because of me, a lot of other women are now participating in rally driving. I salute these women for their achievement and wish them more and more success for their future endeavours. Pakistan Zindabad!”

Bismah Maroof
(cricketer):

The captain of the Pakistan women’s cricket team, playing in Ireland at the moment, also sent her congratulations to Samina and Naila via a voice message sent to Eos. “Many congratulations to Samina Baig and Naila Kiani on becoming the first two Pakistani women to summit K2. It is a huge achievement and more power to you both,” she said.

Fatima Hussain
(javelin thrower):

National javelin champion Fatima Hussain says she was recently hiking in Muzaffarabad when she got the news about Samina and Naila. “I was so happy to learn of their achievement. And being a woman and a Pakistani, my happiness doubled and tripled. I pray that they make the country proud even more in the future, too,” she says.

“Quite frankly, I find hiking in the hills so difficult and challenging that I have all the more respect for anyone who goes beyond that and climbs mountains. Samina and Naila are very brave to have chosen this adventure,” she adds.

Nisha Sultan
(netball captain):

The captain of Pakistan’s women netball team Nisha Sultan also felt overjoyed by the achievement of the two mountain climbers. “I’m so happy for them and for my country,” she says. “Like me, Samina Baig also hails from Gilgit-Baltistan. And having an adventurous spirit myself, I can also see myself learning mountain climbing from her one day.”

For Naila, she said that Naila’s playing several sports and being a multitasker like her makes her identify with her also. “Naila is also a boxer, I hear. I also enjoy other sports such as throwball besides netball. Maybe if we meet, I can also teach both our mountain climbers netball and throwball,” she says.

Anita Karim
(Mixed martial artist)

Pakistan’s mixed martial artist Anita Karim, who also hails from Gilgit-Baltistan like one of the two mountain climbers, says that she is in Thailand at the moment but she congratulated both Samina and Naila on Instagram the moment she heard about their great climb. “I congratulate and applaud both the women on the milestone and full respect to Samina Baig for paving a path for young females to push towards their vision and work hard to achieve it,” she says.

Mehwish Khan
(footballer)

The first international goal scorer for Pakistan in women’s football, Mehwish Khan says that she is in awe of all mountain climbers because she herself has high anxiety. “I am afraid of heights so I am amazed to hear of people summiting some of the highest peaks of the world. And Samina and Naila are the best among them, because they are also women,” she laughs.

“I would like to congratulate them both. They are a true inspiration for all women and not just in Pakistan, but around the world. They have proved how strong women can be. May God Almighty bless them with more success,” she says.

Courtesy: Dawn News Video: YouTube Mountain Tracks Sportswomen of Pakistan rejoice over the recent achievement of mountain climbers Samina Baig and Naila Kiani, who became the first women of their country to summit K2 Samina Baig and Naila Kiani broke the cloud cover and the rocky ceiling to scale new heights and summit the world’s second highest peak, K2. Maybe they can’t hear the cheering and applause right now because they are so high up in the mountains, but Samina Baig and Naila Kiani’s great feat of becoming the first two Pakistani women to summit K2 last week is also being celebrated by other Pakistani sportswomen. Here they are, sending their congratulatory messages to the two. Noorena Shams (squash player): “It was incredible to
Al Qaeda leader Zawahiri killed in US drone strike in Afghanistan: Biden

Courtesy: Dawn News
Reuters/ Agencies

Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri was killed in a US strike in Afghanistan over the weekend, American President Joe Biden said on Monday.

Zawahiri, an Egyptian surgeon who had a $25 million bounty on his head, helped coordinate the Sept 11, 2001, attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people.

US officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the United States carried out a drone strike in the Afghan capital Kabul on Sunday morning at 6:18 a.m. local time.

“Now justice has been delivered, and this terrorist leader is no more,” Biden said in remarks from the White House. “We never back down.”

US intelligence determined with “high confidence” that the man killed was Zawahiri, a senior administration official told reporters. No other casualties occurred.

“Zawahiri continued to pose an active threat to US persons, interests and national security,” the official said on a conference call. “His death deals a significant blow to al Qaeda and will degrade the group’s ability to operate.”

There were rumors of Zawahiri’s death several times in recent years, and he was long reported to have been in poor health.

His death raises questions about whether Zawahiri received sanctuary from the Taliban following their takeover of Kabul in August 2021. The official said senior Taliban officials were aware of his presence in the city.

The drone attack is the first known US strike inside Afghanistan since US troops and diplomats left the country in August 2021.

In a statement, Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid confirmed that a strike took place and strongly condemned it, calling it a violation of “international principles.”

The senior US official said finding Zawahiri was the result of persistent counterterrorism work. The United States identified this year that Zawahiri’s wife, daughter and her children had relocated to a safe house in Kabul, then identified that Zawahiri was there as well, the official said.

“Once Zawahiri arrived at the location, we are not aware of him ever leaving the safe house,” the official said. He was identified multiple times on the balcony, where he was ultimately struck. He continued to produce videos from the house and some may be released after his death, the official said.

In the last few weeks, Biden convened officials to scrutinise the intelligence. He was updated throughout May and June and was briefed on July 1 on a proposed operation by intelligence leaders. On July 25, he received an updated report and authorised the strike once an opportunity was available.

A loud explosion echoed through Kabul early Sunday morning.

“A house was hit by a rocket in Sherpoor. There were no casualties as the house was empty,” Abdul Nafi Takor, spokesman of the interior ministry, said earlier.

One Taliban source, requesting anonymity, said there had been reports of at least one drone flying over Kabul that morning.

With other senior al Qaeda members, Zawahiri is believed to have plotted the October 12, 2000, attack on the USS Cole naval vessel in Yemen which killed 17 US sailors and injured more than 30 others, the Rewards for Justice website said.

He was indicted in the United States for his role in the August 7, 1998, bombings of the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania that killed 224 people and wounded more than 5,000 others.

Both bin laden and Zawahiri eluded capture when US-led forces toppled Afghanistan’s Taliban government in late 2001 following the Sept 11 attacks on the United States.
—————————————————————————————–

How the CIA identified and killed Al Qaeda leader Zawahiri

Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri was killed in a US strike in Afghanistan over the weekend, the biggest blow to the militant group since its founder Osama bin Laden was killed in 2011.

Zawahiri had been in hiding for years and the operation to locate and kill him was the result of “careful patient and persistent” work by the counter-terrorism and intelligence community, a senior US administration official told reporters.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity, the official provided the following details on the operation:

For several years, the US government had been aware of a network that it assessed supported Zawahiri, and over the past year, following the United States’ withdrawal from Afghanistan, officials had been watching for indications of Al Qaeda’s presence in the country.

This year, officials identified that Zawahiri’s family — his wife, his daughter and her children — had relocated to a safe house in Kabul and subsequently identified Zawahiri at the same location.

Over several months, intelligence officials grew more confident that they had correctly identified Zawahiri at the Kabul safe house and in early April started briefing senior administration officials. National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan subsequently briefed President Joe Biden.

“We were able to build a pattern of life through multiple independent sources of information to inform the operation,” the official said.

Once Zawahiri arrived at the Kabul safe house, officials were not aware of him leaving it and they identified him on its balcony — where he was ultimately struck — on multiple occasions, the official said.

Officials investigated the construction and nature of the safe house and scrutinised its occupants to ensure the United States could confidently conduct an operation to kill Zawahiri without threatening the structural integrity of the building and minimising the risk to civilians and Zawahiri’s family, the official said.

In recent weeks, the president convened meetings with key advisers and cabinet members to scrutinise the intelligence and evaluate the best course of action. On July 1, Biden was briefed on a proposed operation in the White House Situation Room by members of his cabinet including CIA Director William Burns

Biden “asked detailed questions about what we knew and how we knew it” and closely examined a model of the safe house the intelligence community had built and brought to the meeting.

He asked about lighting, weather, construction materials, and other factors that could affect the success of the operation, the official said. The president also requested an analysis of the potential ramifications of a strike in Kabul.

A tight circle of senior inter-agency lawyers examined the intelligence reporting and confirmed that Zawahiri was a lawful target based on his continuing leadership of Al Qaeda.

On July 25, the president convened his key cabinet members and advisers to receive a final briefing and discuss how killing Zawahiri would affect America’s relationship with the Taliban, among other issues, the official said. After soliciting views from others in the room, Biden authorised “a precise tailored air strike” on the condition that it minimises the risk of civilian casualties.

The strike was ultimately carried out at 9:48pm ET on July 30 by a drone firing so-called “hellfire” missiles.

Top security
Zawahiri was moved to a “very safe place” in Kabul a few months after the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in August last year, a senior leader of the group told Reuters on Tuesday on the condition of anonymity.

Sherpoor is a quiet, leafy part of Kabul with large houses, where former Afghan general and ethnic Uzbek strongman Abdul Rashid Dostum had lived, among other local dignitaries. Some houses have swimming pools in their attached gardens.

A woman who lives in the neighbourhood and spoke to Reuters on condition of anonymity said she and her family of nine moved to the safe room of their house when she heard an explosion at the weekend. When she later went to the rooftop, she saw no commotion or chaos and assumed it was some rocket or bomb attack — which is not uncommon in Kabul.

Taliban sources said the group gave the “highest-level security” to Zawahiri in Kabul but he was largely inactive operationally and needed the Taliban’s permission to move.

A Kabul police official described Sherpoor as Kabul’s “most safe and secure neighbourhood” and that the drone strike there was a “great shock”.

He said influential people from the former governments of Hamid Karzai and Ashraf Ghani had built spacious houses in Sherpoor. Senior Taliban leaders and their families now lived there, the official said.

Courtesy: Dawn News Reuters/ Agencies Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri was killed in a US strike in Afghanistan over the weekend, American President Joe Biden said on Monday. Zawahiri, an Egyptian surgeon who had a $25 million bounty on his head, helped coordinate the Sept 11, 2001, attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people. US officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the United States carried out a drone strike in the Afghan capital Kabul on Sunday morning at 6:18 a.m. local time. “Now justice has been delivered, and this terrorist leader is no more,” Biden said in remarks from the White House. “We never back down.” US intelligence determined with “high confidence” that the man killed was Zawahiri, a senior administration official told
Touch The World – Make A Difference

SADA-E-WATAN:
By Pervez Saleem

“Do all the good you can,
By all the means you can,
In all the ways you can,
In all the places you can,
At all the times you can,
To all the people you can,
As long as ever you can.”

Brothers dedicated to making the world a more just and compassionate place.

Our Story
Our founder was 12 years old in 1995 when he was inspired to make a difference. From one boy’s story of courage to a global movement, our story shows that young people have the power to change the world. And now in our work, we see it happen every day – youth breaking barriers that prevent them from achieving their fullest potential.

How it all started . . .
Free The Children’s mission is to create a world where all young people are free to achieve their fullest potential as agents of change. And we couldn’t have a better blueprint for success: the organization was founded by Craig Kielburger in 1995 when he gathered 11 school friends to begin fighting child labour. He was 12.

A morning to remember.

That morning, Craig flipped through the Toronto Star in search of the comics, he was struck by a story. A raw, but courageous story of a boy his age named Iqbal.

Iqbal Masih was born in South Asia and sold into slavery at the age of four. In his short life, he had spent six years chained to a carpet-weaving loom. Iqbal captured the world’s attention by speaking out for children’s rights.

A dream is sparked.

Eventually, Iqbal’s wide media coverage caught the attention of those who wished to silence him. At 12, Iqbal lost his life defending the rights of children.

What Craig learned from Iqbal’s story was that the bravest voice can live in the smallest body.

Craig had to do something.

A movement begins.

Craig gathered together a small group of his Grade 7 classmates from his Thornhill, Ontario, school and Free The Children was born.

Free the children from poverty. Free the children from exploitation. Free the children from the notion that they are powerless to effect change.

Those are the messages that sparked Craig’s passion, and continue to fuel the mission of the organization today. Every day the movement grows and every day more young people are free to achieve their fullest potential.

A network of young people grows into a movement.

Today, Free The Children is an international charity and educational partner, with more than 1.7 million youth involved in our innovative education and development programs in 45 countries.
————————————————————————————
Craig Kielburger
Co-founder, ambassador for Free The Children (Volunteer)

Craig Kielburger co-founded Free The Children in 1995 at only 12 years of age. Today, he remains a passionate full-time volunteer for the organization, now an international charity and renowned educational partner that empowers youth to achieve their fullest potential as agents of change.

Free The Children delivers innovative programming to more than 4,000 youth groups and hundreds of thousands of young people in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. As the world’s largest network of children helping children through education, the organization has worked in over 40 countries and built more than 650 schools and school rooms in developing regions, providing education to more than 55,000 children every day.

Every year, Craig and his brother Marc Kielburger organize We Day, Free The Children’s signature domestic event that reaches 90,000 students from 3,000 schools in person and more than 5.4 million through televised broadcasts. We Day has over two million followers on Facebook, making it one of the largest charitable causes in the world.

Free The Children has a proven track record of success, having formed successful partnerships with top school boards and leading corporations-including Oprah’s Angel Network, KPMG and Research In Motion.

Craig is also the co-founder of Me to We. An innovative social enterprise, Me to We provides people with better choices for a better world, including socially conscious and environmentally friendly clothes and accessories, as well as life-changing international volunteer trips, leadership training programs and materials, a speakers’ bureau, and books that address issues of positive social change. In addition, half of Me to We’s net profit is donated to Free The Children, while the other half is reinvested to grow the enterprise and its social mission.

He has shared the stage, and his voice, with Nobel Peace laureates, heads of state, celebrities, rock bands, actors and pop icons, including His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Former President Bill Clinton, Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Sir Richard Branson and many more.

With Marc, Craig writes “Global Voices,” a weekly column about the pressing issues of our time, syndicated in the Vancouver Sun, Halifax Chronicle Herald, Calgary Herald, Edmonton Journal, Winnipeg Free Press, The Huffington Post and Huffington Post Canada online. The Kielburgers also write a weekly advice column in the Globe & Mail called “Ask the Kielburgers.”

Craig is a New York Times bestselling author who has written nine books. His latest is Living Me to We: The Guide for Socially Conscious Canadians.

Craig has a degree in peace and conflict studies from the University of Toronto and is the youngest-ever graduate of the Kellogg-Schulich Executive MBA program. He has received 15 honorary doctorates and degrees, The Roosevelt Freedom Medal, The World Children’s Prize for the Rights of the Child, and is one of the youngest recipients of The Order of Canada. Craig’s work has been featured on multiple appearances on The Oprah Winfrey Show, CNN, 60 Minutes, Piers Morgan Live and The Today Show; and in People, Time and The Economist.
————————————————————————————
Marc Kielburger
Co- founder, ambassador for Free The Children (Volunteer)

Marc Kielburger is the co-founder of Free The Children, an international charity and renowned educational partner that empowers youth to achieve their fullest potential as agents of change.

Free The Children delivers innovative programming to more than 4000 youth groups and hundreds of thousands of young people in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. As the world’s largest network of children helping children through education, the organization has worked in over 40 countries and built more than 650 schools and school rooms in developing regions, providing education to more than 55,000 children every day.

Free The Children has a proven track record of success, having formed successful partnerships with top school boards and leading corporations-including Oprah’s Angel Network, KPMG and Research In Motion.

Marc is also the co-founder and co-CEO of Me to We. An innovative social enterprise, Me to We provides people with better choices for a better world, including socially conscious and environmentally friendly clothes and accessories, as well as life-changing international volunteer trips, leadership training programs and materials, a speakers bureau and books which address issues of positive social change. In addition, half of Me to We’s net profit is donated to Free The Children, while the other half is reinvested to grow the enterprise and its social mission.

Each year, both Craig and Marc Kielburger organize Free The Children’s We Day, the organization’s signature domestic event, which reaches 90,000 students from 3,000 schools in person and more than 5.4 million through televised broadcasts. We Day now has the largest facebook following of any charitable cause in the world.

They share the stage, and their voices, with Nobel Peace Laureates, heads of state, celebrities, rock bands, actors and pop icons, including His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Former President Bill Clinton, Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Sir Richard Branson and many more.

Marc graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University, completing a degree in international relations. He won a coveted Rhodes Scholarship and went on to complete a law degree at Oxford University. Marc has also received six honorary doctorates and degrees for his work in the field of education and human rights.

Along with his brother Craig, Marc writes Global Voices, a weekly column about the pressing issues of our time, syndicated in the Vancouver Sun, Halifax Chronicle Herald, Calgary Herald, Winnipeg Free Press and the Huffington Post and Huffington Post Canada online. Also, the Kielburgers are weekly Globe & Mail columnists for a weekly advice column called “Ask the Kielburgers.”

Marc is also a New York Times bestselling author who has written five books, including Me to We: Finding Meaning in a Material World.

Marc is the recipient of many honours, including the Order of Canada and selected by the World Economic Forum as one of 250 Young Global Leaders. His work has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Colbert Report, 60 Minutes, CNN, BBC, as well as many other news and print media.
————————————————————————————
“Never underestimate the difference YOU can make in the lives of others. Step forward, reach out and help. This week reach to someone that might need a lift.”

http://www.freethechildren.com/about-us/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRYW1Ic-jsU

SADA-E-WATAN:By Pervez Saleem “Do all the good you can,By all the means you can,In all the ways you can,In all the places you can,At all the times you can,To all the people you can,As long as ever you can.” Brothers dedicated to making the world a more just and compassionate place. Our StoryOur founder was 12 years old in 1995 when he was inspired to make a difference. From one boy’s story of courage to a global movement, our story shows that young people have the power to change the world. And now in our work, we see it happen every day – youth breaking barriers that prevent them from achieving their fullest potential. How it all started . . .Free The Children’s mission

Disclaimer:
Sada-E-Watan provides news and opinion articles as a service to our readers. These articles and news items come from sources outside of our organization. Where possible, the author and the source are documented within each article. Statements and opinions expressed in these articles are solely those of the author (reporter/newspaper) or authors (reporters/newspapers) and may or may not be shared by the staff and management of Sada-E-Watan. Sada-E-Watan was created to provide one convenient central location where a user can quickly scan headlines from many news sources. The headlines listed on Sada-E-Watan pages are links to stories on the sites where these stories are located. The goal of Sada-E-Watan is to help readers access stories on web sites that they would normally not have time to view on a regular basis and to add value to the news source sites by mentioning their name on top, so readers can view these sites..

The Sada-E-Watan takes no responsibility for any loss or damage suffered as a result of using the linked websites or as a result of using the information published on any of the pages of the linked websites.

Whilst every effort is made to ensure downloadable content is free from viruses, Sada-E-Watan cannot accept any liability for damages resulting from virus infection. You should take adequate steps to ensure your virus check regularly when using any device.

If you have any questions or comments about Sada-E-Watan, please contact us at: radio@sada-e-watan.com